Critical Military Studies Issues - 2015

 
 
Paul Gough 21.jpg

Volume One, Issue One  

Our inaugural issue in 2015 features an editorial called 'What is Critical Military Studies' by Victoria Basham, Aaron Belkin and Jes Gifkins. Original articles from Cynthia Enloe, Ken MacLeish, Zoë H. Wool, David Serlin, Matthew Rech, Daniel Bos, K. Neil Jenkings, Alison Williams & Rachel Woodward and Caren Kaplan explored everything from feminist, ethnographic and geographical approaches to critical military studies to Smart Homes for disabled veterans and the visual legacies of air power. An editorial by the Encounters team appears alongside Encounters contributions from the San Francisco based artist/photographer, filmmaker, journalist, and creative strategist, Jason Hanasik who offers up insights from his investigation into the fantasy of American Warrior Masculinity through the eyes and experiences of a young man who chose to enrol in the National Junior Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (NJROTC) and from David B. Hobbs who provides an evocative account of a visit to “Ground Zero” and the 9/11 Memorial. 


Volume one, Issue Two

'Re-imagining Hiroshima' guest edited by N.A.J. Taylor & Robert Jacobs seeks to help us rethink the nuclear events of 1945 through original contributions from Ran Zwigenberg on the controversy surrounding the rejection of Isamu Noguchi's design for the Hiroshima cenotaph, from Yuki Miyamoto on women's bodies and the normalization of the the horror of the atomic bombing, Stefanie Fishel on what the different ways of memorializing Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan and the US do to contemporary nuclear weapons debates, Erik Ropers on the politics of the marginalization of zainichi Koreans in survivor testimonies, and Thomas E. Doyle II on Japan's discourse of “nuclear allergy”. Provocative Encounters pieces by photographer Robert Del Tredici and  curator, critic, activist and Professor of Visual Art, Theory and Practice elin o–Hara slavick, re-imagine Hiroshima in the US and Japan respectively, historian and curator of photography Makeda Best examines clothing and personal items as sites through which viewers can connect to the lives and experiences of bombing victims, and Program Director for Youth Arts at Hibakusha Stories Kathleen Sullivan drawa our attention to Nagasaki, with its different memories, suffering, stories, and hibakusha. 

 

 

Tea cup © IWM (EPH 3002).  Whilst on a trip ashore, Lieutenant M P S Lufte RNVR picked up this cup from the rubble and devastation of Hiroshima, in period after the dropping of the first the atomic bomb

Tea cup © IWM (EPH 3002). 

Whilst on a trip ashore, Lieutenant M P S Lufte RNVR picked up this cup from the rubble and devastation of Hiroshima, in period after the dropping of the first the atomic bomb


RATIONING IN BRITAIN DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, 1942© IWM (D 7958)

RATIONING IN BRITAIN DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR, 1942© IWM (D 7958)

Volume One, Issue Three

Our third issue of 2015 features original articles from Jutta Joachim & Andrea Schneiker on how the involvement of NGOs in regulating PMSCs limits their capacity and that of others to crtiique them, from Emily Gilbert on how money and markets are increasingly both the weapon of military intervention and the anticipated outcome, from Joanna Tidy on how food and nostalgia have rehabilitated the British military and from Sanna Strand & Joakim Berndtsson on military recruitment discourses in Sweden and the UK.  In Encounters Trauma nurse Nicola Lester reflects on what happens 'when a soldier dies', artist Helen Snell shares some of her work which aims to bring the human stories behind chilling objects at the National Museum of the Royal Navy to the fore, and visual artist Gail Ritchie offers up glimpses into her research-based art project centred on her great-grandfather Francis (Frank) Ritchie who fought and died in the First World War. Laurie Weinstein also reviews Sarah Hautzinger and Jean Scandlyn's book Beyond post-traumatic stress: homefront struggles with the wars on terror.